Frankenstein -- Articles

  1. Adams, "Frankenstein's Vegetarian Monster"
  2. Aldiss, "The Origins of the Species"
  3. Aldrich and Isomaki, "The Woman Writer as Frankenstein"
  4. Baldick, "The Monster Speaks"
  5. Baldick, "Tales of Transgression, Fables of Industry"
  6. Balestra, "Technology in a Free Society"
  7. Bayer-Berenbaum, "Frankenstein and On the Night of the Seventh Moon"
  8. Behrendt, "The Woman Writer's Fate"
  9. Bennett, "Feminism and Editing Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley"
  10. Berman, "Frankenstein; or, the Modern Narcissus"
  11. Bewell, "An Issue of Monstrous Desire"
  12. Blumberg, "Frankenstein and the 'Good Cause'"
  13. Bohls, "Standards of Taste"
  14. Bok, "Monstrosity of Representation"
  15. Botting, "Frankenstein, Werther and the Monster of Love"
  16. Botting, "Frankenstein and the Language of Monstrosity"
  17. Bowerbank, "The Social Order vs. the Wretch"
  18. Brooks, "Godlike Science/Unhallowed Arts"
  19. Brooks, "What is a Monster?"
  20. Brown, "Philosophical View of the Gothic Novel"
  21. Buchen, "Frankenstein and the Alchemy of Creation"
  22. Burwick, "Goethe's Werther and Frankenstein "
  23. Cantor, "The Nightmare of Romantic Idealism"
  24. Carson, "Bringing the Author Forward"
  25. Cavaliero, "Watchers on the Threshold"
  26. Claridge, "Parent-Child Tensions in Frankenstein"
  27. Clayton, "Concealed Circuits"
  28. Clemit, "Frankenstein, Mary Shelley's Myth-Making"
  29. Clifford, "Caleb Williams and Frankenstein"
  30. Clubbe, "The Tempest-Toss'd Summer of 1816"
  31. Conger, "A German Ancestor for Shelley's Monster"
  32. Cottom, "Frankenstein and the Monster of Representation"
  33. Covi, "The Matrushka Monster"
  34. Crawford, "Wading Through Slaughter"
  35. Crisman, "Now Misery Has Come Home"
  36. Crossley, "Artefacts from the Museums of Science Fiction"
  37. Crouch, "Davy's Discourse"
  38. Curran, "The Siege of Hateful Contraries"
  39. Curran, "The Scientific Grounding of Frankenstein "
  40. Davis, "Frankenstein and the Subversion of the Masculine Voice"
  41. Dickerson, "The Ghost of a Self"
  42. Dunn, "Narrative Distance in Frankenstein"
  43. Dutoit, "Re-specting the Face as the Moral (of) Fiction"
  44. Eichler, "Frankenstein and the Rocky Horror Picture Show"
  45. Ellis, "Mary Shelley's Embattled Garden"
  46. Ellis, "Monsters in the Garden"
  47. Favret, "The Letters of Frankenstein"
  48. Ferguson, "The Gothicism of the Gothic Novel"
  49. Fleck, "Mary Shelley's Notes to Shelley's Poems"
  50. Forry, "An Early Conflict Involving Presumption"
  51. Forry, "Dramatizations of Frankenstein"
  52. Foust, "Monstrous Image"
  53. Freeman, "Frankenstein with Kant"
  54. Friedman, "The Blasted Tree"
  55. Gardner, "Mary Shelley's Divine Tragedy"
  56. Gilbert and Gubar, "Horror's Twin"
  57. Goldberg, "Moral and Myth"
  58. Goodwin, "Domesticity and Uncanny Kitsch"
  59. Griffin, "Fire and Ice in Frankenstein"
  60. Gross and Gross, "Joseph Grimaldi: An Influence"
  61. Haggerty, "Frankenstein and the Unnameable"
  62. Hall, "Horrifying Otherness of Family"
  63. Harvey, "Frankenstein and Caleb Williams"
  64. Heffernan, "Looking at the Monster"
  65. Hetherington, "Creator and Created in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein"
  66. Higdon, "Frankenstein as Founding Myth in The Far Side"
  67. Hill, "Frankenstein and the Physiognomy of Desire"
  68. Hill-Miller, "My Hideous Progeny"
  69. Hindle, "Vital Matters"
  70. Hobbs, "Reading the Symptoms"
  71. Hodges, "Feminine Subversion of the Novel"
  72. Hoehn, "The First Season of Presumption!"
  73. Hogle, "Frankenstein as Neo-Gothic"
  74. Hogle, "Otherness in Frankenstein"
  75. Homans, "Bearing Demons"
  76. Hume, "Gothic Versus Romantic"
  77. Isaacs, "Creation and Responsibility in Science"
  78. Jackson, "Narcissism and Beyond"
  79. Jacobus, "Is There a Woman in This Text?"
  80. Johnson, "My Monster/My Self"
  81. Keech, "The Survival of the Gothic Response"
  82. Kestner, "Narcissism as Symptom and Structure"
  83. Ketterer, "Metaphoric Matrix"
  84. Ketterer, "The Corrected Frankenstein"
  85. Keyishian, "Vindictiveness and the Search for Glory"
  86. Kiceluk, "Made in His Image: Frankenstein's Daughters"
  87. Kiely, "Frankenstein"
  88. Kincaid, "Words Cannot Express"
  89. Knoepflmacher, "Aggression of Daughters"
  90. Kroeber, "Science Fiction vs. Fantasy"
  91. Lamb, "Frankenstein and Milton's Monstrous Myth"
  92. Leader, "Parenting Frankenstein"
  93. Levine, "The Ambiguous Heritage of Frankenstein"
  94. Levine, "The Pattern"
  95. Levine, "The Tradition of Realism"
  96. Lew, "The Deceptive Other"
  97. Lewis, "Frankenstein and Owen Warland"
  98. London, "The Spectacle of Masculinity"
  99. Lovell, "Byron and Mary Shelley"
  100. Loveridge, "Another Monster in Frankenstein?"
  101. Lowe-Evans, "The Civil Servant"
  102. Lowe-Evans, "Minor Rites"
  103. Malamud, "The Gothic Voice in The Waste Land"
  104. Malchow, "Frankenstein's Monster and Images of Race"
  105. Manson and Stewart, "Frankenstein and Failed Unity"
  106. Marder, "The Mother Tongue"
  107. Margolis, "Lost Baggage"
  108. Marshall, "Frankenstein and the 1832 Anatomy Act"
  109. Marshall, "Frankenstein, or Rousseau's Monster"
  110. Massey, "Singles and Doubles"
  111. May, "Sibling Revelry"
  112. Mays, "Frankenstein, Mary Shelley's Black Theodicy"
  113. McInerney, "The Godlike Science of Letters"
  114. McInerney, "Satanic Conceits"
  115. McLane, "Literate Species"
  116. McLeod, "Frankenstein: Unbound and Otherwise"
  117. McWhir, "Teaching The Monster To Read"
  118. Mellor, "A Feminist Critique of Science"
  119. Mellor, "A Feminist Critique of Science, II"
  120. Mellor, "Making a Monster"
  121. Mellor, "My Hideous Progeny"
  122. Mellor, "Promethean Politics"
  123. Mellor, "Usurping the Female"
  124. Mellor, "Problems of Perception"
  125. Mellor, "Revising Frankenstein"
  126. Michie, "Frankenstein and Marx's Theories"
  127. Miller, "The Being and Becoming of Frankenstein"
  128. Mishra, "Sublime as Desecration/Decreation"
  129. Moers, "Female Gothic"
  130. Moretti, "The Dialectic of Fear"
  131. Morse, "The Transposition of Gothic"
  132. Murray, "Changes in the 1823 Edition"
  133. Murray, "Shelley's Contribution to Frankenstein"
  134. Musselwhite, "The Making of a Monster"
  135. Neff, "Frankenstein and the Empire of the Nairs"
  136. Neff, "Hostages to Empire"
  137. Newman, "Mary and the Monster"
  138. Newman, "Narratives of Seduction"
  139. Nichols, "The Acting of Thomas Potter Cooke"
  140. Novak, "Gothic Fiction and the Grotesque"
  141. Oates, "Frankenstein's Fallen Angel
  142. O'Flinn, "Production and Reproduction"
  143. O'Rourke, "Nothing More Unnatural"
  144. Paulson, "Gothic Fiction and the French Revolution"
  145. Pike, "Resurrection of the Fetish"
  146. Ping, "The Majesty of Goodness"
  147. Pitcher, "Fitzgerald's Frankenstein"
  148. Pitcher, "Frankenstein as Short Fiction"
  149. Pollin, "Philosophical and Literary Sources"
  150. Poovey, "My Hideous Progeny"
  151. Randel, "The Intertextuality of Mountains"
  152. Rauch, "The Monstrous Body of Knowledge"
  153. Reed, "Will and Fate in Frankenstein"
  154. Restuccia, "Female Gothic Writing"
  155. Richardson, "From Emile to Frankenstein"
  156. Rieger, "Dr. Polidori and the Genesis of Frankenstein"
  157. Roberts, "The Paradigm of Frankenstein"
  158. Roberts, "Immortality, Gender and the Rosy Cross"
  159. Rose, "Custody Battles"
  160. Ross, "The Limits of Rivalry"
  161. Rowen, "The Making of Frankenstein's Monster"
  162. Rubenstein, "My Accursed Origin"
  163. Ryan, "Mary Shelley's Christian Monster"
  164. Sanderson, "Glutting the Maw of Death"
  165. Sayres, "Compounding the Crime"
  166. Schopf, "Of what a strange nature is knowledge!"
  167. Scott, "Vital Artifice . . . the Psychopolitical Integrity"
  168. Scrivener, "Frankenstein's Ghost Story"
  169. Sedgwick, "Toward the Gothic"
  170. Seed, "Frankenstein -- Parable or Spectacle?"
  171. Shattuck, "Faust and Frankenstein"
  172. Sherwin, "A Psychoaesthetic Reading"
  173. Sherwin, "Creation as Catastrophe"
  174. Slusser, "The Frankenstein Barrier"
  175. Small, "Godwin and Godwinism"
  176. Small, "Shelley and Frankenstein"
  177. Smith, "Horror Versus Tragedy"
  178. Soyka, "Frankenstein and the Miltonic Creation of Evil"
  179. Spector, "Science Fiction and the Sex War"
  180. Spivak, "A Critique of Imperialism"
  181. Stableford, "Frankenstein and the Origins of Science Fiction"
  182. Stein, "Monsters and Madwomen"
  183. Sterrenburg, "Politics and Psyche in Frankenstein"
  184. Stevick, "Frankenstein and Comedy"
  185. Sullivan, "Race, Gender, and Imperial Ideology"
  186. Swingle, "Poets, Novelists, and the Romantic Situation"
  187. Swingle, "Frankenstein's Monster and Its Romantic Relatives"
  188. Tannenbaum, "From Filthy Type to Truth"
  189. Thomas, "Recovering Nightmares"
  190. Tillotson, "A Forced Solitude"
  191. Todd, "Frankenstein's Daughter"
  192. Twitchell, "Frankenstein and the Anatomy of Horror"
  193. Twitchell, "Frankenstein and Sons"
  194. Varnado, "Haunted Presence"
  195. Veeder, "The Negative Oedipus"
  196. Veeder, "Self-Division and Projection"
  197. Wade, "Shelley and the Miltonic Element"
  198. Waxman, "Frankenstein's Romantic Fate"
  199. Weissman, "The Complaint of a Political Wife"
  200. Weissman, "Fiends and Families"
  201. Wexelblatt, "The Ambivalence of Frankenstein"
  202. Willis, "Frankenstein and the Soul"
  203. Wilt, "Frankenstein as Mystery Play"
  204. Winnett, "Coming Unstrung"
  205. Young, "The Monster Within"
  206. Youngquist, "The Mother, the Daughter, and the Monster"
  207. Zdanys, "Rasakolnikov and Frankenstein"
  208. Ziolkowski, "Science, Frankenstein, and Myth"
  209. Zonana, "Safie's Letters as the Feminist Core"